Astonishing moment HUGE tiger snake is found inside a toilet bowl in popular Melbourne restaurant  

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Astonishing moment a HUGE tiger snake is found curled inside a toilet bowl in a popular Melbourne restaurant

  • Melbourne restaurant owners discovered tiger snake lurking in toilet bowl  
  • Tiger snakes commonly found in Melbourne, one of most venomous in the world 
  • Snake catcher released the deadly reptile five kilometres away in state park
  • Also found poisonous copperhead snake at  Lynbrook train station on same day 

A large tiger snake has been found curled inside the back toilet of a popular restaurant in Melbourne. 

Snake catcher Raymond Hoser was called to catch the huge 1.5metre male reptile on Tuesday. 

The snake was hiding inside the bowl of the toilet behind restaurants on Yarra Street in Warrandyte. 

The deadly tiger snake was hiding in the loo behind restaurants on Yarra Street in Warrandyte

The deadly tiger snake was hiding in the loo behind restaurants on Yarra Street in Warrandyte

Snake catcher, Raymond Hoser (pictured) said the group of shops back onto a river and it is common for the reptiles to appear in Spring as they find somewhere warm to sun themselves

Snake catcher, Raymond Hoser (pictured) said the group of shops back onto a river and it is common for the reptiles to appear in Spring as they find somewhere warm to sun themselves

Mr Hoser said the group of shops back onto a river and he is called out every year when the snakes come out of hibernation to enjoy the warm weather. 

‘Tiger snakes climb enough to confuse things which means it could have come from anywhere,’ said Mr Hoser. 

The reptile was taken to the local state park in Warrandyte and was set free at least 500 metres from the nearest house. 

‘Releasing is the hard part, we have to let them go within 5 kilometres of where we find them and we want to do that as far away from houses as possible,’ he explained.  

Hours after he released the tiger snake into the wild, the snake catcher responded to a call for help from staff at Lynbrook Railway Station in Melbourne. 

A one-metre-long copperhead was sunning itself on the footpath to the platform – which backs onto Paterson Drive Reserve.  

‘You can bet your bottom dollar, the snake would have been hibernating near where it was found, because the weather is warm but not hot so they won’t travel to far from their resting spot,’ said Mr Hoser.   

A copperhead snake (pictured) similar to the one found at the Lynbrook Railway Station in Melbourne on Tuesday

A copperhead snake (pictured) similar to the one found at the Lynbrook Railway Station in Melbourne on Tuesday

He was surprised he had not received a call earlier in August as the snakes usually appear near the track at the end of Winter. 

‘I get called to the station for a snake  and I will usually find two or three in the same spot.’  

Both the copperhead and tiger snakes are highly venomous – and commonly found across southeastern Australia.  

Bites are fatal if untreated and can cause pain in the feet and neck as well as tingling, numbness and sweating – followed by breathing difficulties and paralysis.

Hospitals advise to call an ambulance if bitten – and then apply a bandage – without wiping off the venom, it helps them to identify the type of snake bite.

Copperhead (pictured) and tiger snakes are highly venomous and commonly found across southeastern Australia, particularly in Melbourne

Copperhead (pictured) and tiger snakes are highly venomous and commonly found across southeastern Australia, particularly in Melbourne

WHAT TO DO IF BITTEN BY A SNAKE

Call an ambulance

Keep the person still, moving helps spread the venom through the lymphatic system

Use an elasticised roller bandage that is 10-15cm wide and roll over bite site 

Apply a second elasticised bandage, as tightly as possible, by starting just above the fingers or toes and moving upwards on the bitten limb as far as the bandage will reach 

If there are no bandages available use any stretchy material including torn-up t-shirts, stockings or other fabric 

Do not try to chase or catch the snake 

Do not wash the venom off the skin as hospital staff can use this to identify the type of snake

Do not cut the area or try to suck the venom out

Do not use a tourniquet 

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