Australia’s top chefs reveal ingredients they can’t live without at home

Australia’s top chefs reveal ingredients they can’t live without at home

Comments Off on Australia’s top chefs reveal ingredients they can’t live without at home

From sesame oil to a high-quality salt: These are the ingredients Australia’s top chefs can’t live without in their kitchen cupboards – and they’re all VERY affordable

  • Australia’s top chefs have revealed the ingredients they can’t live without
  • Japanese-born chef Tetsuya Wakuda said he can’t go past soy sauce 
  • While chef Dan Hunter said he uses sesame oil as a substitute for olive oil

Australia’s top chefs have revealed the ingredients they can’t live without – including sesame oil, bread and the ‘allium’ family.

Japanese-born chef Tetsuya Wakuda, the owner of Sydney’s fine dining restaurant Tetsuya’s, said he can’t go past the ‘comforting taste’ of soy sauce.

‘Soy sauce is one of the kinds of salt. It’s another salt for me. It’s giving a saltiness and at the same time giving you a tastiness – an umami,’ he told Good Food.

Japanese-born chef Tetsuya Wakuda (pictured), the owner of Sydney's fine dining restaurant Tetsuya's, said he can't go past the 'comforting taste' of soy sauce

Japanese-born chef Tetsuya Wakuda (pictured), the owner of Sydney’s fine dining restaurant Tetsuya’s, said he can’t go past the ‘comforting taste’ of soy sauce

The well-respected chef said his go-to are Japanese soy sauce and shoyu, which is made from fermented soybeans, wheat, salt and water - and he uses it to enhance the flavour of a dish or as a dressing (file image)

The well-respected chef said his go-to are Japanese soy sauce and shoyu, which is made from fermented soybeans, wheat, salt and water – and he uses it to enhance the flavour of a dish or as a dressing (file image)

The well-respected chef said his go-to are Japanese soy sauce and shoyu, which is made from fermented soybeans, wheat, salt and water – and he uses it to enhance the flavour of a dish or as a dressing.

Chef Dan Hunter, the owner of three-hat Brae restaurant in Victoria, said he uses sesame oil as a substitute for olive oil.

‘Sesame oil really has quite an aromatic and potent flavour but it’s still quite light and delicate,’ he explained. 

Dan said he prefers to add a splash of sesame oil on poached chicken or used as a salad dressing. 

Chef Blayne Bertoncello, the co-owner of O.My restaurant, said he can't get enough of the allium family, which includes onions, garlic, chives, leeks, shallots and green onion (file image)

Chef Blayne Bertoncello, the co-owner of O.My restaurant, said he can’t get enough of the allium family, which includes onions, garlic, chives, leeks, shallots and green onion (file image)

Chef Dan Hunter, the owner of three-hat Brae restaurant in Victoria, said he uses sesame oil as a substitute for olive oil

Chef Daniel Puskas, the owner of Sydney's three-hat Sixpenny, said his favourite ingredient is bread

Chef Dan Hunter (left) said he uses sesame oil as a substitute for olive oil, while Daniel Puskas (right) said his favourite ingredient is bread

Head chef Blayne Bertoncello, the co-owner of O.My restaurant in Victoria, said he can’t get enough of the allium family, which includes onions, garlic, chives, leeks, shallots and green onion.

‘It’s got so many different levels of intensity. Some of the varieties are quite sweet,’ he said.

Blayne said the ingredients make a good base of different flavours for stocks, sauces and stews. 

Michael Ryan, the chef and owner of Provenance in Victoria, said he always keeps high-quality salt in his pantry cupboard at home.

‘I like the minerality of it. When I use cheap cooking salt, I always end up overseasoning because it has such a different texture,’ he said.

He uses Murray River salt, which is produced using the pristine mineralised brines from ancient saline aquifers of the Murray Darling basin.

Chef Daniel Puskas, the owner of Sydney’s three-hat Sixpenny, said his favourite ingredient is bread. He enjoys slathering a piece of toast with butter, Vegemite and half an avocado.

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Manoj Prajapati

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