Eerie images show how Covid has left a 5-star hotel in Bali completely deserted

A once bustling five-star resort in Bali is now unrecognisable as the Covid-19 pandemic forces tourists out of the island and luxury hotels are left abandoned.

The Padma Resort in Legian, on the island’s west coast, stretches more than 6 hectares, boasts five swimming pools, multiple restaurants and overlooks the beach.

Usually at this time of year the resort would be at almost full capacity but as the global pandemic continues to wreak havoc across Indonesia, the hotel now stands empty.

A once bustling five-star resort in Bali is now unrecognisable as the Covid-19 pandemic forces tourists out of the island and luxury hotels are left abandoned (pictured Padma Resort in Legian on New Year’s Eve)

The Padma Resort in Legian, on the island's west coast, stretches more than 6 hectares, boasts five swimming pools, multiple restaurants and overlooks the beach

The Padma Resort in Legian, on the island’s west coast, stretches more than 6 hectares, boasts five swimming pools, multiple restaurants and overlooks the beach

Ross Taylor, the president of the Western Australia based Indonesia Institute said he has been in talks with the owner of the Padma Resort, and fears it’ll be sometime before Australians are allowed to visit.

‘I was talking to the owner yesterday and he was saying it’s really eerie because the five swimming pools are just lying idle,’ Taylor told The West Live.

‘There’s not one room taken, it’s just deadly quiet, and he said at this time of year, normally, they’d be running at 98 per cent capacity.’

Some living in the Indonesian island have been lucky enough to visit the Padma Resort and have the luxury hotel all to themselves.

Photos which are in stark contrast to a pre-Covid life show visitors swimming in the many pools at the resort that are now completely deserted.

Entry to Indonesia is only open to foreign nationals already holding a valid stay permit who must return a negative coronavirus test before they fly and quarantine for 14 days upon their arrival.

For a country that relies heavily on tourists to stay afloat, the pandemic has left many locals and businesses struggling to make ends meet.

Travellers are seen enjoying a dip in the pool at the Padma Resort on Bali's west coast before coronavirus hit

Travellers are seen enjoying a dip in the pool at the Padma Resort on Bali’s west coast before coronavirus hit

Usually at this time of year the resort would be at almost full capacity but as the global pandemic continues to wreak havoc across Indonesia, the hotel now stands empty

Usually at this time of year the resort would be at almost full capacity but as the global pandemic continues to wreak havoc across Indonesia, the hotel now stands empty

Mr Taylor said while the resorts may be empty, most hotels had been using the time off to renovate and revamp their venues for when tourists are finally allowed back in.

‘So what their plan is in Bali is once we get over this COVID issue … is to bounce back better and stronger than before,’ he said.

But he expects lounging around at Bali resorts won’t be a reality for Australians until at least next year.

Bali officials are now asking the Indonesian government to explore the possibility of ‘travel corridors’ with certain countries.

These could include opening up travel with low-risk countries that have successfully administered mass vaccination programs such as China.

Travellers would need to be vaccinated and return a negative Covid-19 result before arriving in Bali.

Bali has had more than 32,000 coronavirus cases and 881 deaths. Indonesia has had more than 34,000 deaths (pictured tourist at Padma Resort)

Bali has had more than 32,000 coronavirus cases and 881 deaths. Indonesia has had more than 34,000 deaths (pictured tourist at Padma Resort)

Authorities have also pushed for tourism workers to receive the vaccine first as 130,000 doses were delivered to the island this week as part of the second phase in Bali’s capital Denpasar.

Bali has had more than 32,000 coronavirus cases and 881 deaths. Indonesia has had more than 34,000 deaths.

The Indonesian government predicted $14billion was lost from tourism in 2020.

Foreign tourist arrivals in Indonesia slumped 89.22 percent year-on-year to 164,970 in August 2020. Meanwhile, Bali arrivals plunged 100 percent to just 12.

Pre-COVID, more than a million Australians travelled to Indonesia each year and made up more than a quarter of Bali tourists.

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