Queensland picnic disturbed by two-metre-long carpet python at Mt Coot-Tha Botanic Gardens

Horrifying moment a massive snake slithers onto a picnic blanket during a family’s get-together at a popular park

  • A two-metre long carpet python has welcomed itself to an outdoor gathering
  • The snake disrupted the picnic at Mt Coot-Tha Botanic Gardens in west Brisbane
  • The python stretched across the picnic blanket, knocking over boxes of fruit










An unexpected guest has caused chaos at a family picnic in a popular park, slithering through baskets and on to the blanket.

The two-metre long carpet python welcomed itself into the outdoor gathering in the Mt Coot-Tha Botanic Gardens, west of Brisbane on Tuesday.

‘That’s a nice little rug,’ one onlooker says as the huge snake weaves its way through eskies.

The friendly python perched itself on top of boxes of fruit, as the cameraman filmed from only metres away.

‘Wow, look! That’s where daddy was sitting like five minutes ago,’ one man says to his child.

Seemingly unfazed by the people around it, the python continues forward, knocking over food containers and stretching the length of the baby blue blanket.

A friendly carpet python has welcomed itself to a family picnic at Mt Coot-Tha Botanic Gardens on Tuesday (pictured)

Once it crosses the edge of the blanket and realises it has an audience, the snake retreats backwards, with another man heard saying it was ‘going for a tree’.

Carpet pythons are a type of non-venomous snake that come in a range of different colours, shapes and sizes.

They are commonly found in backyards of homes in northern NSW and Queensland, and generally don’t bother humans – being incredibly timid in most circumstances.

The two-metre-long python stretched across the length of the blanket, knocking over containers of food (pictured)

The two-metre-long python stretched across the length of the blanket, knocking over containers of food (pictured)

Another man from Ballina in northern NSW had a recent encounter with a carpet python – curling up on his dish rack.

Keith Williams posted an image of his dish rack to Twitter, showing a massive snake attempting to hide in the corner of his kitchen.

The Councillor for the Ballina Shire on the North Coast of NSW wrote: ‘I can’t believe I cleared part of the dish rack before I even noticed.

Keith Williams posted a picture of huge carpet python (pictured) curled on his clean dishes to Twitter

Keith Williams posted a picture of huge carpet python (pictured) curled on his clean dishes to Twitter

With a bit of quick thinking, Mr Williams opened his window hoping the huge carpet python would slither out and into his backyard.

‘Update: Lovely python has made its way outside and all is returning to normal,’ Mr Williams posted to Twitter.

‘Now if you’ll excuse me, I’ve got a lot of washing up to redo’.

CARPET PYTHONS: ARE THEY DANGEROUS?

Carpet pythons come in all different shapes, sizes and colours, ranging from browns and black to olive green.

The patterns on carpet pythons can range from rings to various shapes splotches as well as diamonds.

Carpet pythons are commonly found in backyards of homes in northern NSW and Queensland, and the closely related diamond python is native to NSW and Victoria.

These pythons are timid and non-venomous, but when provoked can provide a painful bite with teeth that fast backwards.

Carpet pythons feed on rats and mice, and will generally be found at homes feeding on them – but will stay away from people and move on when there is no more food.

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